users online Carbonated Sanity
mothpeep:

why

mothpeep:

why

(Source: lusidar, via roachpatrol)

ktshy:

shortcuttothestars:

Pixie warrior by shortcuttothestars Term from pidgequeen <3

Hey mich-tripp-comic!

fyeahwelcometohell:

Sock is a sweet but somewhat unstable teen who commits suicide after the accidental murder of his own parents. In Hell he meets Mephistopheles, the amicable manager of the underworld, who offers him a job: Sock is to become a demon, tasked with haunting humans and driving them to suicide. At first this seems like Sock’s dream job—a way he can finally act on his desires without consequence—but after meeting his first target, a disinterested highschooler named Jonathan, he finds himself with another desire that just might be stronger… and just might have a consequence.

Welcome to Hell (2013)
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(via nanosbeat)

humoristics:

A guy once told my lesbian friend that being a lesbian is a huge turn off for guys and that she’ll never find a boyfriend.

(via amummy)

telltalegames:

Your choices will decide Clem’s fate. Who will YOU become? #MyClementine

Don’t miss this special trailer for The Walking Dead: Season Two Finale, 'NO GOING BACK,' arriving for download starting next week! 

  • 8/26 - PC/Mac, PlayStation 3 & PS Vita North America 
  • 8/27 - Xbox 360, PlayStation 3 & PS Vita Europe 
  • 8/28 - iPhone & iPad via the App Store 

Although this video contains MAJOR spoilers for previous episodes in The Walking Dead Season One and Two, there are NO spoilers for the finale… but do watch for an all-new scene created exclusively for the trailer! 

(via oschocodee)

rufusmcdoofus:

soporcupcakes:

In case you haven’t seen or heard, somebody finally beat the 7th night with all the animatronics set to A.I. 20

image

(via sircuddlebuns)

curtdogg:

Charles Martinet just joined Vine, and it’s already the best thing.

(via triptrippy)

hatsunemiku-v3:

! LISTEN WITH HEADPHONES !

reol/giga in left side

rin/luka in right side

(via p-curly)

starexorcist:

bluedelliquanti:

faitherinhicks:

scarygoround:

One thing I don’t undertand in comics is characters talking with their mouths closed. You see it all the time in mainstream books. I’m certain there’s a point when I was drawing comics that I flipped from not even thinking about the closed mouth talkers (my early stuff is full of them) to really hating them. It completely punctures the reality of a panel for me if someone’s talking with their mouth closed.

This drives me crazy! A speech bubble floating above a character’s head, and he or she has their mouth shut. Don’t do this! It loses the immediacy of the dialog when the mouth isn’t open.

Like lots of rules in comics, this is a good one to notice and understand why it exists, so that you know when it’s okay to break it. 
Having the character’s mouth open during dialogue helps with the immediacy, as Faith says. You can even draw the mouth in such a way that you can see what word in the bubble they’re emphasizing, and is therefore the most important. See how in David Willis’s fifth panel here, you can tell Jacob’s saying “Sorry?”

But there is value in having a character’s mouth be closed at certain moments in dialogue sequences. If you see a closed mouth after a word balloon, your brain adds a “beat” for finality. It can add time and alter the rhythm of a conversation. It can also clarify the mood of a character or scene.
I reread the archives of Templar, Arizona recently, and there’s a character, Reagan, who dominates nearly every scene she’s in. She’s physically expressive and has a distinct speaking style. He mouth rarely closes. When it does, it’s during a very serious conversation. She’s dialing down her bombastic personality so other people will pay attention to her, because something is wrong.

When I designed my comic’s leads, I wanted to physically distinguish them in as many ways as I could. In Al’s default state, his mouth is usually closed. Al evolved into a character who does better with silence, because his mustache is a great tool for being expressive without any dialogue. Chuck Jones taught me that.

Brendan’s default, on the other hand, is having his mouth open most of the time. It helps show how he dominates the dialogue and the chemistry between him and Al. When his mouth is shown closed during a dialogue scene, it’s very deliberate. When you notice artists following these helpful rules, understand when it might be more effective to break them.



Also it’s important to remember that several letters and sounds require the mouth to be closed (B, F, M, P, V, all cause you to close your mouth)

starexorcist:

bluedelliquanti:

faitherinhicks:

scarygoround:

One thing I don’t undertand in comics is characters talking with their mouths closed. You see it all the time in mainstream books. I’m certain there’s a point when I was drawing comics that I flipped from not even thinking about the closed mouth talkers (my early stuff is full of them) to really hating them. It completely punctures the reality of a panel for me if someone’s talking with their mouth closed.

This drives me crazy! A speech bubble floating above a character’s head, and he or she has their mouth shut. Don’t do this! It loses the immediacy of the dialog when the mouth isn’t open.

Like lots of rules in comics, this is a good one to notice and understand why it exists, so that you know when it’s okay to break it. 

Having the character’s mouth open during dialogue helps with the immediacy, as Faith says. You can even draw the mouth in such a way that you can see what word in the bubble they’re emphasizing, and is therefore the most important. See how in David Willis’s fifth panel here, you can tell Jacob’s saying “Sorry?”

amazi-girl's boots should be uggs

But there is value in having a character’s mouth be closed at certain moments in dialogue sequences. If you see a closed mouth after a word balloon, your brain adds a “beat” for finality. It can add time and alter the rhythm of a conversation. It can also clarify the mood of a character or scene.

I reread the archives of Templar, Arizona recently, and there’s a character, Reagan, who dominates nearly every scene she’s in. She’s physically expressive and has a distinct speaking style. He mouth rarely closes. When it does, it’s during a very serious conversation. She’s dialing down her bombastic personality so other people will pay attention to her, because something is wrong.

image

When I designed my comic’s leads, I wanted to physically distinguish them in as many ways as I could. In Al’s default state, his mouth is usually closed. Al evolved into a character who does better with silence, because his mustache is a great tool for being expressive without any dialogue. Chuck Jones taught me that.

image

Brendan’s default, on the other hand, is having his mouth open most of the time. It helps show how he dominates the dialogue and the chemistry between him and Al. When his mouth is shown closed during a dialogue scene, it’s very deliberate. When you notice artists following these helpful rules, understand when it might be more effective to break them.

image

Also it’s important to remember that several letters and sounds require the mouth to be closed (B, F, M, P, V, all cause you to close your mouth)